Experiment 1

  • a LOT of text, even for one individual hover (especially on mobile)

  • text colour (neither light nor dark) is not legible across colour contrast in image

green_fire_canvas_elke_van_breemen_sm (1

Western Tanager Piranga ludoviciana

A birding favourite, the western tanager brightens foggy rainforest days with its colourful plumage. Caribou are considered an indicator species or a “canary in the coal mine” with regards to gaging ecosystem health. The tanager, native to British Columbia’s (BC) inland rainforests, is visually representative of the canary, its lemon-yellow feathers shining vibrantly in an ecosystem dimmed by degradation.

Northern Goshawk accipiter gentilis 

Like wolves, goshawks were shot, trapped and bounty hunted throughout much of the 20th century, perceived as a threat to domestic poultry. These secretive raptors reside in large tracts of undisturbed forest. Now protected from hunting, goshawks face declines due to habitat loss.

Gray Wolf Canis lupus

Wolves are social, communicative, family-oriented animals. Strong bonds help wolves survive and thrive, and intact family units offer ecological services such as reducing the spread of disease, providing food for scavengers, and enhancing riparian habitat. When wolf packs unravel, so do the ecosystem connections that rely on this important apex predator.

 

Over 3000 wolves have been killed in the form of aerial gunning, strangling snares, and poisoning by caribou recovery programs in Alberta and BC in the past 15 years, including 1208 wolves in BC since 2015. This past winter alone saw 498 wolves killed in 10 caribou ranges across BC. The killing is not only unethical, but sadly, in vain. Up-to-date science disputes the focus of management on predator control, finding that the wolf-kill programs will be ineffectual in saving caribou from extinction. Furthermore, these programs have been a distraction from meaningful recovery measures which begins with adequate habitat protection.

Radio Collared

In the cruel, yet government-sanctioned “Judas wolf” practice, an individual is pursued from helicopter, tranquilized, radio collared, and tracked by satellite in order to access its pack. In turn, the wolf’s family is gunned down as they flee, leaving many individuals to suffer a painful and prolonged death. The collared wolf is often left alive to seek a new pack, which becomes the next target. Unlike Judas, however, the lone wolf does not choose its bloody betrayal.

Clear-cut Logging

Clearcutting of lichen-bearing forests is recognized as the primary cause for the decline of deep snow caribou, yet massive tracts of old growth and mature forest continue to be destroyed in critical caribou habitat each year.

Old growth is a non-renewable resource: It is impossible to gain back the biodiversity, created by thousands of years of evolution, that is lost once an ancient forest is flattened.

Arboreal Hair Lichens Alectoria & Bryoria spp.
Arboreal hair lichens, sometimes referred to as “old man’s beard” or “witch’s hair” are found only in forests older than 80 years. Deep snow caribou rely almost exclusively on these slow-growing lichens for their winter diet, which they are able to reach from atop the deep snowpack. 

Experiment 2

  • darkening of the image on hover so that the text shows up

green_fire_canvas_elke_van_breemen_sm (1

Western Tanager Piranga ludoviciana

A birding favourite, the western tanager brightens foggy rainforest days with its colourful plumage. Caribou are considered an indicator species or a “canary in the coal mine” with regards to gaging ecosystem health. The tanager, native to British Columbia’s (BC) inland rainforests, is visually representative of the canary, its lemon-yellow feathers shining vibrantly in an ecosystem dimmed by degradation.

Northern Goshawk accipiter gentilis 

Like wolves, goshawks were shot, trapped and bounty hunted throughout much of the 20th century, perceived as a threat to domestic poultry. These secretive raptors reside in large tracts of undisturbed forest. Now protected from hunting, goshawks face declines due to habitat loss.

Gray Wolf Canis lupus

Wolves are social, communicative, family-oriented animals. Strong bonds help wolves survive and thrive, and intact family units offer ecological services such as reducing the spread of disease, providing food for scavengers, and enhancing riparian habitat. When wolf packs unravel, so do the ecosystem connections that rely on this important apex predator.

 

Over 3000 wolves have been killed in the form of aerial gunning, strangling snares, and poisoning by caribou recovery programs in Alberta and BC in the past 15 years, including 1208 wolves in BC since 2015. This past winter alone saw 498 wolves killed in 10 caribou ranges across BC. The killing is not only unethical, but sadly, in vain. Up-to-date science disputes the focus of management on predator control, finding that the wolf-kill programs will be ineffectual in saving caribou from extinction. Furthermore, these programs have been a distraction from meaningful recovery measures which begins with adequate habitat protection.

Radio Collared

In the cruel, yet government-sanctioned “Judas wolf” practice, an individual is pursued from helicopter, tranquilized, radio collared, and tracked by satellite in order to access its pack. In turn, the wolf’s family is gunned down as they flee, leaving many individuals to suffer a painful and prolonged death. The collared wolf is often left alive to seek a new pack, which becomes the next target. Unlike Judas, however, the lone wolf does not choose its bloody betrayal.

Clear-cut Logging

Clearcutting of lichen-bearing forests is recognized as the primary cause for the decline of deep snow caribou, yet massive tracts of old growth and mature forest continue to be destroyed in critical caribou habitat each year.

Old growth is a non-renewable resource: It is impossible to gain back the biodiversity, created by thousands of years of evolution, that is lost once an ancient forest is flattened.

Arboreal Hair Lichens Alectoria & Bryoria spp.
Arboreal hair lichens, sometimes referred to as “old man’s beard” or “witch’s hair” are found only in forests older than 80 years. Deep snow caribou rely almost exclusively on these slow-growing lichens for their winter diet, which they are able to reach from atop the deep snowpack. 

Experiment 3

  • short text on hover with links to full text underneath image

green_fire_canvas_elke_van_breemen_sm (1

Western Tanager

A birding favourite, the western tanager brightens foggy rainforest days with its colourful plumage. 

Northern Goshawk 

Like wolves, goshawks were shot, trapped and bounty hunted throughout much of the 20th century.

Radio Collared

A cruel, yet government-sanctioned practice of betrayal.

Northern Goshawk accipiter gentilis  
Like wolves, goshawks were shot, trapped and bounty hunted throughout much of the 20th century, perceived as a threat to domestic poultry. These secretive raptors reside in large tracts of undisturbed forest. Now protected from hunting, goshawks face declines due to habitat loss.

Radio Collared
In the cruel, yet government-sanctioned “Judas wolf” practice, an individual is pursued from helicopter, tranquilized, radio collared, and tracked by satellite in order to access its pack. In turn, the wolf’s family is gunned down as they flee, leaving many individuals to suffer a painful and prolonged death. The collared wolf is often left alive to seek a new pack, which becomes the next target. Unlike Judas, however, the lone wolf does not choose its bloody betrayal. 

Western Tanager Piranga ludoviciana
A birding favourite, the western tanager brightens foggy rainforest days with its colourful plumage. Caribou are considered an indicator species or a “canary in the coal mine” with regards to gaging ecosystem health. The tanager, native to British Columbia’s (BC) inland rainforests, is visually representative of the canary, its lemon-yellow feathers shining vibrantly in an ecosystem dimmed by degradation.